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Version: 1.47.0

API

Each table is mapped to an entity named after the table's name. In the following reference, we'll use some placeholders, but let's start with an example:

Example

Given this SQL executed against your database:

CREATE TABLE pages (
id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
title VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
body TEXT NOT NULL
);
  • [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME] is pages
  • [SINGULAR_ENTITY_NAME] is page
  • [PRIMARY_KEY] is id
  • fields are id, title, body

GET and POST parameters

Some APIs needs the GET method, where parameters must be defined in the URL, or POST/PUT methods, where parameters can be defined in the HTTP request payload.

Fields

Every API can define a fields parameter, representing the entity fields you want to get back for each row of the table. If not specified all fields are returned.

The fields parameter is always sent in the query string, even for POST, PUT and DELETE requests, as a comma-separated value.

GET /[PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]

Returns all entities matching where clause

Where Clause

You can define many WHERE clauses in REST API, each clause includes a field, an operator and a value.

  • Field: One of the fields found in the schema.
  • Operator follows this table:
Platformatic operatorSQL operator
eq'='
in'IN'
nin'NOT IN'
neq'<>'
gt'>'
gte'>='
lt'<'
lte'<='
  • Value: The value you want to compare the field to.

For GET requests all these clauses are specified in the query string using the format where.[FIELD].[OPERATOR]=[VALUE]

Example

To get the title and the body of every page where id < 15, make an HTTP request like this:

$ curl -X 'GET' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/?fields=body,title&where.id.lt=15' \
-H 'accept: application/json'

Combining Where Clauses

Where clause operations are by default combined with the AND operator. To create an OR condition, use the where.or query parameter.

Each where.or query parameter can contain multiple conditions separated by a | (pipe).

Example

To get the posts where counter = 10 OR counter > 30, make an HTTP request like this:

$ curl -X 'GET' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/?where.or=(counter.eq=10|counter.gte=30)' \
-H 'accept: application/json'

OrderBy clause

You can define the ordering of the returned rows within your REST API calls with the orderby clause using the following pattern:

?orderby.[field]=[asc | desc]

  • Field: One of the fields found in the schema.
  • Value: can be asc or desc.

Example

To get the pages ordered alphabetically by their titles, make an HTTP request like this:

$ curl -X 'GET' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages?orderby.title=asc' \
-H 'accept: application/json'

Total Count

If totalCount boolean is true in query, the GET returns the total number of elements in the X-Total-Count header ignoring limit and offset (if specified).

$ curl -v -X 'GET' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/?limit=2&offset=0&totalCount=true' \
-H 'accept: application/json'

(...)
> HTTP/1.1 200 OK
> x-total-count: 18
(...)

[{"id":1,"title":"Movie1"},{"id":2,"title":"Movie2"}]%

POST [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]

Creates a new row in table. Expects fields to be sent in a JSON formatted request body.

Example

$ curl -X 'POST' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/' \
-H 'accept: application/json' \
-H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
-d '{
"title": "Hello World",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic!"
}'

{
"id": 1,
"title": "Hello World",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic"
}

GET [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]/[PRIMARY_KEY]

Returns a single row, identified by PRIMARY_KEY.

Example

$ curl -X 'GET' 'http://localhost:3042/pages/1?fields=title,body

{
"title": "Hello World",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic"
}

POST [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]/[PRIMARY_KEY]

Updates a row identified by PRIMARY_KEY.

Example

$ curl -X 'POST' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/1' \
-H 'accept: application/json' \
-H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
-d '{
"title": "Hello Platformatic!",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic!"
}'

{
"id": 1,
"title": "Hello Platformatic!",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic"
}

PUT [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]/[PRIMARY_KEY]

Same as POST [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]/[PRIMARY_KEY].

PUT [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]

Updates all entities matching the where clause

Example

$ curl -X 'PUT' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages?where.id.in=1,2' \
-H 'accept: application/json' \
-H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
-d '{
"title": "Updated title!",
"body": "Updated body!"
}'

[{
"id": 1,
"title": "Updated title!",
"body": "Updated body!"
},{
"id": 2,
"title": "Updated title!",
"body": "Updated body!"
}]

DELETE [PLURAL_ENTITY_NAME]/[PRIMARY_KEY]

Deletes a row identified by the PRIMARY_KEY.

Example

$ curl -X 'DELETE' 'http://localhost:3042/pages/1?fields=title'

{
"title": "Hello Platformatic!"
}

Nested Relationships

Let's consider the following SQL:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS movies (
movie_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
title TEXT NOT NULL
);
CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS quotes (
id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
quote TEXT NOT NULL,
movie_id INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES movies(movie_id)
);
  • [P_PARENT_ENTITY] is movies
  • [S_PARENT_ENTITY] is movie
  • [P_CHILDREN_ENTITY] is quotes
  • [S_CHILDREN_ENTITY] is quote

In this case, more APIs are available:

GET [P_PARENT_ENTITY]/[PARENT_PRIMARY_KEY]/[P_CHILDREN_ENTITY]

Given a 1-to-many relationship, where a parent entity can have many children, you can query for the children directly.

Example

$ curl -X 'GET' 'http://localhost:3042/movies/1/quotes?fields=quote

[
{
"quote": "I'll be back"
},
{
"quote": "Hasta la vista, baby"
}
]

GET [P_CHILDREN_ENTITY]/[CHILDREN_PRIMARY_KEY]/[S_PARENT_ENTITY]

You can query for the parent directly, e.g.:

$ curl -X 'GET' 'http://localhost:3042/quotes/1/movie?fields=title

{
"title": "Terminator"
}

Many-to-Many Relationships

Many-to-Many relationships let you relate each row in one table to many rows in another table and vice versa.

Many-to-many relationships are implemented in SQL via a "join table", a table whose primary key is composed by the identifier of the two parts of the many-to-many relationship.

Platformatic DB fully support many-to-many relationships on all supported database.

Let's consider the following SQL:

CREATE TABLE pages (
id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
the_title VARCHAR(42)
);

CREATE TABLE users (
id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
username VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE editors (
page_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
user_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
role VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
CONSTRAINT fk_editor_pages FOREIGN KEY (page_id) REFERENCES pages(id),
CONSTRAINT fk_editor_users FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES users(id),
PRIMARY KEY (page_id, user_id)
);
  • [P_ENTITY] is editors
  • [P_REL_1] is pages
  • [S_REL_1] is page
  • [KEY_REL_1] is pages PRIMARY KEY: pages(id)
  • [P_REL_2] is users
  • [S_REL_2] is user
  • [KEY_REL_2] is users PRIMARY KEY: users(id)

Available APIs for the Join Table

GET [P_ENTITY]/[S_REL_1]/[KEY_REL_1]/[S_REL_2]/[KEY_REL_2]

This returns the entity in the "join table", e.g. GET /editors/page/1/user/1.

POST [P_ENTITY]/[S_REL_1]/[KEY_REL_1]/[S_REL_2]/[KEY_REL_2]

Creates a new entity in the "join table", e.g. POST /editors/page/1/user/1.

PUT [P_ENTITY]/[S_REL_1]/[KEY_REL_1]/[S_REL_2]/[KEY_REL_2]

Updates an entity in the "join table", e.g. PUT /editors/page/1/user/1.

DELETE [P_ENTITY]/[S_REL_1]/[KEY_REL_1]/[S_REL_2]/[KEY_REL_2]

Delete the entity in the "join table", e.g. DELETE /editors/page/1/user/1.

GET /[P_ENTITY]

See the above.

Offset only accepts values >= 0. Otherwise an error is returned.

Pagination

Platformatic DB supports result pagination through input parameters: limit and offset

Example

$ curl -X 'GET' 'http://localhost:3042/movies?limit=5&offset=10

[
{
"title": "Star Wars",
"movie_id": 10
},
...
{
"title": "007",
"movie_id": 14
}
]

This returns 5 movies starting from position 10. The TotalCount functionality can be used in order to evaluate if there are more pages.

Limit

By default a limit value (10) is applied to each request. Clients can override this behavior by passing a value. In this case the server validates the input, and an error is return if exceeds the max accepted value (100).

Limit's values can be customized through configuration:

{
...
"db": {
...
"limit": {
"default": 50,
"max": 1000
}
}
}

Limit only accepts values >= 0. Otherwise an error is return.

Offset

By default offset is not applied to the request. Clients can override this behavior by passing a value.

Offset only accepts values >= 0. Otherwise an error is return.

Allow the primary keys in the input

@platformatic/sql-openapi allows for specifying if to accept the table primary keys in the inputs to the various routes.

Configuration

app.register(require('@platformatic/sql-openapi'), {
allowPrimaryKeysInInput: false
})

Example

If allowPrimaryKeysInInput is set to false:

$ curl -X 'POST' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/' \
-H 'accept: application/json' \
-H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
-d '{
"id": 42,
"title": "Hello Platformatic!",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic!"
}'

{
"id": 1,
"title": "Hello Platformatic!",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic"
"statusCode": 400,
"code": 'FST_ERR_VALIDATION',
"error:" 'Bad Request',
"message": 'body/id must NOT be valid'
}

If allowPrimaryKeysInInput is set to true or left undefined:

$ curl -X 'POST' \
'http://localhost:3042/pages/' \
-H 'accept: application/json' \
-H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
-d '{
"id": 42,
"title": "Hello Platformatic!",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic!"
}'

{
"id": 42,
"title": "Hello Platformatic!",
"body": "Welcome to Platformatic"
}